Boss FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb Pedal Review

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Boss FRV-1 63 Fender Reverb Pedal Review

Summary

  • Pros: A well-constructed, rugged pedal, that fairly emulates a 1963 Fender Spring Reverb unit.
  • Cons: Limited versatility, with no true bypass.
  • Overall: For guitarists who want to emulate that classic Fender ’63 surf-sound, the FRV-1 is for you.

Boss FRV-1 Fender Reverb Sale

Full Review

The FRV-1 Fender Reverb pedal digitally-emulates an original 1963 Fender Spring Reverb unit. The FRV-1 has three knobs: Mixer (the volume-level of reverb in the mix), Tone (from dark and ambient to super-bright), and Dwell (delay time of the reverb). Its settings allow the user to magically emulate the classic guitar sound created by Fender’s ‘63 tube-driven spring reverb unit, the sound that defined surf rock in the early-sixties. The FRV-1 can switch from surf to rockabilly to blues to country-twang, and for just a little stompbox with a light touch of reverb, it sounds amazing.

One drawback: the Boss FRV-1 pedal, unlike other reverb pedals out there, has only one type of reverb. And spring reverb is very idiosyncratic, and retro-sounding. That said, this pedal does an incredible job of digitally copying and cloning the sound of an original spring unit. Those guitarists desiring an effects pedal that can be versatile, and can create a wide range of different tones, should be warned that the FRV-1 would not be the best choice to put in your gear-bag.

All in all though, this is the best-constructed, best-sounding, surf-to-rockabilly-cloned reverb pedal around. If you love the spring reverb sound, you will bow down in worship to this little box. Boss is renowned for having great stompboxes, and the FRV-1 continues that legacy.

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Boss FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb Demo

Boss FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb Pedal Review4Admin2014-04-21 06:47:44The FRV-1 Fender Reverb pedal does a remarkable job of digitally-emulating an original 1963 Fender Spring Reverb unit. The FRV-1 has three knobs: Mixer (the volume-level of reverb in the mix), Tone (from dark and ambient to super-bright), and Dwell (delay time of the reverb). Its settings allow the user to magically emulate the classic guitar sound created by Fender’s ‘63 tube-driven spring reverb unit, the sound that defined surf rock in the early-sixties. Continue reading Check Prices

One Comment

  1. I own a Fender ’63 reverb. Have used it for around 20 years now.

    I got one of these Boss pedals as a backup, or for stages that aren’t very stable or where footfalls cause the Fender reverb’s spring to crash (think the opening noise on “Wipeout”).

    The Boss pedal’s “emulation” isn’t even close to the sound and response of the real Fender reverb. Not remotely the same. Horrible, digital-sounding, fake, harsh and just plain wrong.

    So I sold the Boss on Ebay to some poor sucker who’s probably never even heard the real thing, never mind played through one.

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